Tag: phd

Nam June Paik (1932–2006)

Our life is half natural and half technological. Half-and-half is good. You cannot deny that high-tech is progress. We need it for jobs. Yet if you make only high-tech, you make war. So we must have a strong human element to keep modesty and natural life.  Nam June Paik

Korean-born American artist Paik influence the art of video and television intensely.

89063b2c168b5fb33bbe96575b5ee8136a323d64.jpg
TV Garden (1974)

 

5f63de8d23b65cb04d1b837463eb9b509b87dab8.jpg
V-yramid (1982)
larger.jpg
Computerised One Hundred Flowers, 1998

 

 

Electronic super highway –

“Skin has become inadequate in interfacing with reality. Technology has become the body’s new membrane of existence.” —Nam June Paik

paik_tvcello_tvbuddha

Culture and Digital

Digital applications convert the very habitual traditions of the cultures. For example, coffee fortune telling. This traditional behaviour of the Turkish people goes online on these days. People with smart phones are taking the pictures of their cups and send them to the virtual character who analyses the coffee cups and send them the analysis report simultaneously.

Archive

 

 

The archive is first the law of what can be said, the system that governs the appearance of statements as unique events. But the archive is also that which determines that all these things said do not accumulate endlessly in an amorphous mass, nor are they inscribed in an unbroken linearity, nor do they disappear at the mercy of chance external accidents; but they are grouped together in distinct figures, composed together in accordance with multiple relations, maintained or blurred in accordance with specific regularities; that which determines that they do not withdraw at the same pace in time, but shine, as it were, like stars, some that seem close to us shining brightly from far off, while others that are in fact close to us are already growing pale. —Michel Foucault

“The very idea of the archive shaped how photography developed from its invention in the 1830s. The standardisation of cameras and film formats, the standardisation of printed matter, the standardisation of the family album, the picture library, the computer image file, the press agency and even the modern art gallery – these are all archival forms of, and for, the photographic image.”

 

Spatiality

 

Spatiality of the Digital Environment

For the first time, space becomes media type. (Manovich, 2001)

Much like the other types of media such as text, audio, video and stills space has become media type.

While  linear media such as books and films can depict space,only digital environments can present space that we can move through.

Being able to navigate into the digital space give a dramatic engagement for the users.

Computing without Computers

Because computers are sensory deprived and physically limited there is new search to present computing without computers. Integrating the nanotechnology into the other tools and the environments is a popular trend of the day.

Technology transforms the unintelligent, static objects to mobile, intelligent, active forms. These artefacts are designed to record, categorise, and serve as reflecting personalised taste in return.

On the other hand, these technological artefacts are also in a relationship with each other.

 

9ity

Contemporary Media Studies

Contemporary media can be used interchangeably in various context with different authors.  What this research mostly referring to  Lev Manovich who describes the technology as an inseparable component of the digital media and work on the data mining in digital environments, Andreas Treske who presents video, as an immersive atmosphere, which resists the narrative dictatorship and lastly Ernst Wolfgang who wrote an archive-oriented media theory and assert the dynamic nature of the digital video archive.

Imagination

Imagination is like going down the rabbit hole. By the origin of the word it is picturing, imaging oneself. It’s a great ability of the human that can connect the different points and creates new ideas, images, concepts of external objects not present to the senses.

Contemporary area, which is governed by scientific taste, creates its narrative genre called science fiction.

From Jules Verne to Star Trek, science fiction has proven to be remarkably prescient in developing new technologies and shaping attitudes towards that technology. As a reminder, a promise of the science fiction requires material, physical, rationalisation rather than a supernatural or arbitrary. Material rather than the supernatural is its key attribution. However, it is hard to differentiate the well-developed technology from the supernatural. So let’s face the music. Isaac Asimov wrote about the connected library that everyone can access, in a short story called “From The ‘London Times’ in 1904, Mark Twain predicted the internet in 1898 when telephones were still a very novel form of communication. John Brunner also wrote about the many issues related to computer technology. One of the contemporary ways of communication has already written by Jelus Verne in 1889. Talking holograms do not only appear in the Star Trek, they become to come around. There was a voice-controlled computer in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Voice control has become mainstream software like Siri on the iPhone 4S. Besides, the first aeroplane television was seen in 2001: A Space Odyssey. Now you can see it anytime you take a flight. Cyberspace was the word from the Necromancer that was written by W. Gibson. Kurtzwell had already written that intelligence machine will win the chess match in 1990 before IBM’s Deep Blue won in 1997.


The Spielberg film A.I. was based on a Brian Aldiss story, “Super-Toys Last All Summer Long”.


The question of imaginary media is: What can be imagined, and under what historical, social and political conditions? What are the conditions for the media imaginaries of the modern mind and contemporary culture, and on the other hand, how do imaginaries condition the way we see actual technologies?(Parikka, 2012, What is Media Archeology pg 47)

3Nation

Imagination, Navigation and Narration

Narration as a music on the stage continuously intervenes the motion of imagination and navigation as a waiter waiting next to imagination, keeps recordings of its reactions, findings and requests. In a circular pattern, navigation leads the choices of imagination and its requests for / by determining the music’s rhyme. It is arguably true that by greater precision in  both narrators’ and characters’ involvement in processes will result in a more flexible and more adequate typology.

Possibility for imagination, to jumps to the narration’s place and begin to play its own music, does exist.

“Short stories are tiny windows into other worlds and other minds and dreams. They are journeys you can make to the far side of the universe and still be back in time for dinner.”—Neil Gaiman, 1960